Archive for ‘Architecture’

April 1, 2016

Newgrange 

Newgrange  
It is a remarkable place. Five thousand years ago the mysterious people who lived in the Boyne Valley created one of the marvels of the ancient world. They assembled an immense and sophisticated structure to try and make sense of the conundrum of life and death and to fill the blackest of all voids with some semblance of meaning. 

Breathtaking. Imagine standing deep inside the womb-like darkness at the centre of the tomb just before 9.00 am on the 21st December, the Winter Solstice. From the East, as the Sun emerges over the hills beyond comes a shard of warm morning light, it slowly makes its way along the floor of the passageway, finally alighting on a special stone upon which human ashes were once carefully placed. The gap between life and death, light and dark, this world and the Other must have seemed gossamer thin…

But the moment didn’t last, it was just an illusion, frustrating in its brevity, a tantalising mirage of what seemed forever beyond reach…

Some words of Jesus kept coming to my mind as we walked around:

I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.

And Isaiah:

The people walking in darkness have seen a great light; on those living in the land of deep darkness a light has dawned. 

In Christ the light is not infrequent, obscure or hidden away for the chosen few, but for all people everywhere…

In him was life, and the life was the light of all people. (John 1:4)

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April 29, 2015

London

We were in London recently for a wedding. It’s a long time since we were last there and it was great to catch up with my cousin (Thank you Louise, you looked after us wonderfully during our stay), and to do some sightseeing.

With a population of 8.3 million, it is the largest city in Europe and the twenty-first largest in the world. It receives 15 million visitors a year. It is a city where over 300 languages are spoken. (Nicky Gumbel)

It’s a big place and coming from West Cork, the bigness is all the bigger! Here’s a small selection of the many photos we took… DSC_3145_wp Perhaps the most famous house in Britain…

DSC_3201_wp The Natural History Museum – one of the favourite venues of my childhood…

DSC_3247_wp The Great Court at the British Museum.

DSC_3249_wp Columns at the British Museum

DSC_3251_wp Wonderful Lion detail on the entrance door to the British Museum

DSC_3287_wpView over the houses of Parliament from the ‘London Eye’.

DSC_3151_wpUh oh, been spotted!

April 10, 2015

Camden Quay

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Strolling across a bridge over the river Lee yesterday evening, the reflection of the buildings along Camden Quay looked remarkable. I only had my phone to take the picture – how I wish I carried my ‘proper’ camera around more often!

Here’s a picture of the same location from 1955 (the night of the Opera House Fire) on the Cork City Council website.

August 25, 2014

“But who do you say that I am?”

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(Photo: Statue of Christ in the Gothic Memorial Church, Kylemore Abbey, Co. Galway.  July 2014)

Sermon for Sunday 24th August.  Text – Matthew 16:13-20

13 Now when Jesus came into the district of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, ‘Who do people say that the Son of Man is?’ 14 And they said, ‘Some say John the Baptist, but others Elijah, and still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.’ 15 He said to them, ‘But who do you say that I am?’

Sooner or later we all have to deal with the Great Question. The great question is one that Jesus asked of His disciples and it is a question which each of us must give an answer to also. The question Jesus asks is: “But who do you say that I am?’ (Repeat).

Those who have grown up in the church and can recite the creeds in their sleep are perhaps most in danger. We are so used to the liturgy and the prayers that we go through a church service on autopilot, without ever actually really engaging with what we are (or should be) doing. We might answer the question from our head saying that, “Yes, Jesus is of course the Son of God our Saviour who died for us upon the cross and rose again on the third day etc. etc.” And we can say all this (and even sound convincing when we say it), but the reality is that even though our heads know the right thing to say, in actual fact our hardened hearts are far from Him. We need to let go of our protective wall of hardness because not only does it keep people out, it keeps Christ out too.

In the previous chapter (15), in verse 8, Jesus, speaking about the religious church-going folk of the day said: “This people honours me with their lips, but their hearts are far from me.”

I don’t like saying it, but that is a warning for us. We are guilty. We honour God with our lips when we are in church, but our hearts are far from Him. What do we need to do?

First of all we need to repent. We need to acknowledge our sin to God. We need to say sorry for just going through the motions of Christianity. We need to say sorry for coming to church merely out of a sense of duty. We need to say sorry for busying ourselves with all the activity of church and parish life and thinking that that is enough to make God like us.

Secondly we need to be thankful. God has provided the means for us to be right with Him. Jesus Christ, the Son of God took upon Himself our sins upon the cross. When we repent, when we say “sorry”, He will forgive us and He will cleanse us from our sins. Because of Jesus, God the Father sees us as spotless and without any blemish when we allow Jesus to be our Lord and Saviour. Let us fully take on board what God has done for us and let the roof of this place be lifted off with the power and strength and passion of our thankful praise and worship.

Thirdly we need to invite God to come into our hearts and dwell there. Perhaps we have been going to church all our lives and yet we have never unlocked the door of our hearts and let Him in. Maybe we let Him in years ago but over the time since the weeds have grown up and we have become closed to His working in our lives; we have built up barriers of resistance to the Spirit and we no longer know His power or His leading in and of our lives.

Fourthly, we need to get serious about serving Him. Let’s get this straight, turning up at church is not serving God. We can only truly serve God once we have got to know Him and we can only get to know Him once we have acknowledged Him as Lord and Saviour and invited Him into our hearts.   Once we have a relationship with God, He will then lead us and show us how, when and where He wants us to serve Him. This is a big obstacle for many people because we don’t want to be told what to do. We want to be in charge and we want to make our own decisions. But it is impossible to be a Christian and be our own boss. It is impossible to serve Christ and only go where we want to go and do what we want to do. It just doesn’t work like that. He has to be in charge, He has to be number one. If we look at our lives and wonder why God has never really used us, the answer most certainly is that it is because we have not let Him! To begin with, when we were a young Christian, God tried to gently lead us, but every step of the way we thought we knew best, and now look at us, we no longer know God’s leading and our life for Him is but a pale shadow of what it could have been. But don’t despair, whether we are 18 or 80 it is not too late. All we have to do is acknowledge our sin and rededicate our lives to God, to allow Him to come into our hearts and lives and then when He asks us to do something we do it! He will never ask us to do something without helping us and giving us the power to do it. Yes it will mean leaving our comfort zones but He is with us and as St. Paul said “If God is for us who can ever be against us?” (Rom. 8:31b).

Where is our Passion? Where is our commitment?

Benjamin Kwashi, a Christian leader from Jos, Nigeria, tells the following story of how the gospel came to his part of the country:

Missionaries came to my home area of Nigeria in 1907. One of them was a man named Reverend Fox. Reverend Fox was a professor at Cambridge University, and when he arrived his walk with Christ was so deep that he led many people to Christ. He founded a church and moved about 10 kilometers away to Amper, my own hometown, and founded the church there too. How a first-class [scholar] from the University of Cambridge was communicating to illiterates, I don’t know, but God suddenly gave him favour and people were turning to Jesus Christ. So many people came to Christ that he wrote to his younger brother, who was a physician also in Cambridge, and asked him to come and help him because medical practice was needed. As his brother started the journey from England, Reverend Fox fell ill and died. Soon after his brother arrived, he also fell ill and died.

The Church Mission Society wrote to their father, who was also a pastor. When they told him he had lost two sons, he and his wife [mourned deeply], but then in their grief they did something astounding. They sold their land and property, took the proceeds to the mission society, and said, “As much as we grieve the death of our two sons, we will only be consoled if the purpose for which they died continues.” They gave that money and walked away.

Recently I looked through the profile of those two missionaries who came to my hometown. They both had first-class educations and degrees from the best universities. They died as young men—the oldest was only 32. They gave up everything to serve Jesus and bring the gospel to my country. Were they crazy? No, they had heard what Jesus had said, they believed it, and they were willing to stake their whole lives on the truth of Jesus’ words. These men wanted to end their lives well. No matter how long or short their life, it wasn’t going to be wasted, but they would invest it for eternity.[1]

Will we give up everything to serve Jesus? Are we willing to stake our whole life on the truth of Jesus’ words? Today, right now He looks us in the eye and He says “What about you, who do you say that I am?” Will we give up everything to serve Him? Today is our opportunity to say enough is enough and to stop our old selfish and insecure way of living. Today is the day to invite Him into our hearts and say ‘here I am Lord, I am Yours, I will serve You from now on for the rest of my life. You are number One.’

Let us pray together: Dear Lord Jesus, I am so sorry for my sin, for going my own way and being my own boss. I acknowledge my sin before You now … Thank you Lord that You died for me, in my place upon the cross. I give my life to You now and I invite You to come into my life, into my heart. Please use me Lord to serve you in whatever way You wish. Please lead me and guide me in Your ways, because You are the way the truth and the life. Lord I ask all this in Your precious and Holy Name … Amen.

[1] http://www.preachingtoday.com/illustrations/2014/august/3081814.html

July 3, 2014

Random Light No. 9

Here are some photos taken in the last few months…

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A Worcestershire Poppy field

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Colourful Kinsale

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Evening Reflections at Trimpley reservoir, Worcestershire

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A family of ducks makes their way home in the last light of the day…

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One of Fota’s more colourful residents…

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Bantry harbour boats (with “cross-process” effect)

DSC_8811_wpMwnt, Ceredigion.

 

May 26, 2014

The Beach House

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It’s been a while since we have been to any of the beaches in East Cork.  The house above is in a wonderful location not too far from Garryvoe, a place that we often used to make a trip to when we lived nearby.  It’s a quiet, isolated location and would make a wonderful place to retreat to, a perfect weekend or holiday home.  Although it is up for sale, by the looks of things it would need a lot of work.  It would be lovely to think of somebody buying it who has the time and resources not only to repair it but to enjoy it as well…

September 3, 2013

Le parapluie rouge

Le parapluie rouge

A man standing, waiting for the rain to ease up, looks towards Quimper Cathedral as scurrying shoppers and tourists hurry past its ancient walls.