Posts tagged ‘Barley’

July 17, 2013

Random Light No. 8

Hungry Horse 1

Shire Horse at Courtmacsherry, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/1000 ƒ/6.7 ISO 160 35mm

Manch Woods

Bluebells at Manch Woods, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/90 ƒ/8 ISO 220 35mm

Mullaghmore Harbour

Mullaghmore Harbour, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/250 ƒ/8 ISO 100 35mm

Mullaghmore window

Mullaghmore Window, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/750 ƒ/5.6 ISO 100 35mm

Loughanelteen Panorama

Loughanelteen, Co. Sligo, (Panorama taken with Samsung Galaxy Note II)

Ripening Barley

Ripening Barley, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/125 ƒ/6.7 ISO 200 300mm

DSC_6945.jpg

Pippa the puppy, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/125 ƒ/3.3 ISO 100 35mm

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August 22, 2012

White already for harvest.

In what must be the answer to many a farmer’s prayer, the sun is shining at last. The large number of combine harvesters and tractors on the narrow roads are making driving around the parish a hair-raising experience, but it is great to see the work being done. Perhaps the upcoming season of Harvest services will be a time of thanksgiving after all, even though this year has been one of the worst in living memory for all those involved in agriculture.

The Bible verse that came to mind as I was taking this picture, was from John’s Gospel in the old King James version:

“… behold, I say unto you, Lift up your eyes, and look on the fields; for they are white already to harvest.”
John 4:35b

The Lord Jesus is comparing a field ready for harvesting to the many people who are (after centuries of waiting for the Messiah to come), ready to hear his gospel message and to know Him as Lord and Saviour.

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Photo Notes: I used a very wide angle lens for this shot (a Tokina 12-24mm f4). I set the aperture to f22 and thankfully it was bright enough at that aperture to get a shutter speed of 1/50 at 100 ISO. The unusual colouring is a Lightroom preset called ‘Coldtone.’ See the picture on Flickr here.

July 28, 2011

Barley Field

Barley Field

This field full of Barley (I think it’s Barley but please feel free to correct me) is growing nearby.  As is so often the case around here, it was just about to rain, so the sky was quite dramatic!  I think the photo looks a bit better in black and white.

A quick look on biblegateway.com shows a surprising number of references to Barley in the Bible – my favourite is the feeding of the 5000 as recorded in Chapter 6 of John’s gospel:

5 When Jesus looked up and saw a great crowd coming toward him, he said to Philip, “Where shall we buy bread for these people to eat?” 6 He asked this only to test him, for he already had in mind what he was going to do.   7 Philip answered him, “It would take more than half a year’s wages to buy enough bread for each one to have a bite!”   8 Another of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother, spoke up, 9 “Here is a boy with five small barley loaves and two small fish, but how far will they go among so many?” 10 Jesus said, “Have the people sit down.” There was plenty of grass in that place, and they sat down (about five thousand men were there). 11 Jesus then took the loaves, gave thanks, and distributed to those who were seated as much as they wanted. He did the same with the fish.   12 When they had all had enough to eat, he said to his disciples, “Gather the pieces that are left over. Let nothing be wasted.” 13 So they gathered them and filled twelve baskets with the pieces of the five barley loaves left over by those who had eaten.   14 After the people saw the sign Jesus performed, they began to say, “Surely this is the Prophet who is to come into the world.”

June 30, 2010

Golden Hour

Towards Castlefreke and Long Strand

Towards Castlefreke and Long Strand

There’s a time in the evening when the sun is thinking about setting but seems reluctant to do so.  Low in the sky the light is soft and filtered, imparting a certain ‘glow’ to everything.

As I stood in that field of Barley, I felt like I was in the midst of a great painting, a work of genius, by the great Artist.  It was a moment of beauty; I could hear the sea rush against the shore to my left and I could smell the earthy ground, still wet from the recent rainfall.  A breeze was gently blowing across the fields so that the Barley seemed – almost – to mimic the movement of the nearby waves.  There was a mist beginning to rise in the distant hollows and I knew that the special light was about to leave, so I reluctantly did the same.