Posts tagged ‘Co. Cork’

August 13, 2015

“Imprints of Light” Exhibition

Soon we will be leaving Cork to move to Dublin, where I will take on a new role as a school chaplain (more on that another day). We have greatly enjoyed our twelve years in this wonderful part of Ireland and God-willing we will return for holidays and other adventures in the future.

One of the things I have been asked to do before we go is to have an exhibition of photographs for the Timoleague Festival. I feel very honoured to have been asked and a little daunted by the whole undertaking. Thankfully I have some excellent help from a parishioner who is also a very accomplished and gifted photographer and who knows a good deal about this sort of thing. The photos will go up later today and the display will be open to the public from Saturday for a week.

Here is a gallery of the photos that have been printed for the exhibition; some of them have appeared on this blog before and others are new:

August 3, 2015

An evening drive 

With excitement and eager anticipation we took an evening drive towards the sea, headlong into the boisterous weather. Angry waves, blustering wind and sideways rain and it’s thirteen degrees, it does not feel like August! I got out of the car on the road overlooking Ownahincha to take this photo (with the ‘Snapseed’ app my phone), fighting against the car door as the wind tried to push it closed. A perfect day for chip shop chips, steaming out of a brown paper bag, followed (of course) by ice cream…

May 9, 2014

Mizen head cliffs

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Back in mid March we took a trip down to Mizen Head, Ireland’s most south-westerly extremity.  It was a lovely clear day but quite cold and very windy (our youngest son lost his hat over the edge of the cliff during a particularly strong gust!).

The above view was well worth the climb to get there.  The transatlantic route lies just south of here and this is the last view of Ireland for the seafarer heading west.  It is not difficult to imagine the emotion that many must have felt as they stood on deck, making their way to a new life in a new world, excited by the new beginnings that lay ahead but sad at all that they were leaving behind…

July 17, 2013

Random Light No. 8

Hungry Horse 1

Shire Horse at Courtmacsherry, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/1000 ƒ/6.7 ISO 160 35mm

Manch Woods

Bluebells at Manch Woods, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/90 ƒ/8 ISO 220 35mm

Mullaghmore Harbour

Mullaghmore Harbour, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/250 ƒ/8 ISO 100 35mm

Mullaghmore window

Mullaghmore Window, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/750 ƒ/5.6 ISO 100 35mm

Loughanelteen Panorama

Loughanelteen, Co. Sligo, (Panorama taken with Samsung Galaxy Note II)

Ripening Barley

Ripening Barley, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/125 ƒ/6.7 ISO 200 300mm

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Pippa the puppy, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/125 ƒ/3.3 ISO 100 35mm

May 9, 2013

A ‘thin’ place

I’ve read of ‘thin places’, a term originally used by Christians in the Celtic-speaking world of the early Middle Ages to describe places where it seemed the veil between heaven and earth was ‘thin’.

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This all came to mind recently as we were walking along Harbour View Beach (off the R600 between Timoleague and Kinsale).

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We have walked there many times, but it felt particularly ‘thin’ that day…  IMG_20130508_174149

(All photos taken on my phone and processed with Instagram)

 

September 9, 2012

A ‘Soft Day’.

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If the Eskimos have many different words to describe snow, so here in West Cork there are many words to describe the numerous types of rain that we enjoy in this part of the world. One of my favourites was stated by a wise old farmer who greeted me earlier today with the words:

Grand soft day.

And that was it, no more needed to be said. The rain today was not heavy, it was not that awful sideways stuff that blows in off the Atlantic, it was gentle, misty and slightly swirling; in a word it was most definitely ‘soft’.
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I had been invited to come along ‘and show my face’ at a vintage threshing day near Pedlar’s Cross (halfway between Clonakilty and Bandon). Although I brought my camera with me I left it I the car (due to my not wanting to expose it to the ‘soft’ conditions). So I only had the iPhone to take pictures with.
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I really love these community events, enjoyed by all ages, farmers and non-farmers alike. There is something here for everyone to enjoy and appreciate and everyone has time to talk, whether it’s about the weather, the price of milk, the hurling final or anything you like.

A grand soft day it was.

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September 5, 2012

Walking at the edge of the world

Last Saturday we joined with a sizeable number of others taking part in the annual Sheep’s Head walk for Christian Aid. The “Sheep’s Head” is a peninsula in West Cork jutting out twenty one kilometres into the Atlantic Ocean and is only four kilometres across at its widest point. It is a truly spectacular location. We started from and finished at Kilcrohane Community Centre, with a very enjoyable walk along the way.

We soon found ourselves up at about 300m above sea level and the views were spectacular. Then what so often happens anywhere along the West coast of Ireland happened – the clouds and mist started to roll in off the sea.

But the light remained bright, so even though we were walking in cloud and fog, the visibility remained good. Just occasionally the veil was lifted and a swirling gap of light presented the opportunity to take a picture of the wonderful and vast scape of land and sea. At times it was hard to see where the sky, sea and land met each other, such was the wonderful array and trickery of the light.

Of course the whole point of the walk was to raise money for Christian Aid. Andrew Coleman and his team of volunteers had (as they always do) done an excellent job of organising the day and making it enjoyable for all ages and walking abilities. In brief but powerful words, Canon Patrick Hewitt reminded us that the distance we had walked that day would be a daily necessity for many, whether to collect water, medicines or simply to go to school. In some small yet not insignificant way the money raised by this event would go to help people a long way from this place, that at that moment we somehow felt a little closer to even though in many ways in comparison with them it felt like we were walking at the edge of the world…

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Link to photos on Flickr:

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June 15, 2011

Which way?

Ballinspittle, Co. Cork


I was walking back to the car with two very hot ‘Americanos to go’, so balancing them vertically with my left hand and trying to hold the camera in my right I fired off this quick shot of the signpost in Ballinspittle. It was not until after I had taken the picture that I realised I was unwittingly entertaining some builders who were not working too hard!

Thankfully the picture came out OK, though if I were to take it again I would do so from a lower angle so as to avoid having any background other than the sky (as I think the background here is distracting).

I love those old signs with the distances in miles. Many times I can remember driving to places, and you would see a sign saying, for example, ‘Sligo 16’ and then around a couple of bends there would be another saying ‘Sligo 18’. The old signs are less clinical and have a more ‘ah sure you’ll get there soon enough’ attitude. I miss miles, kilometres are much too European for my liking!

May 13, 2011

Window (on the past)

I must have passed this window dozens of times and never really noticed it before.  It is on the road between Timoleague and Kilmalooda – ‘in the middle of nowhere’, you might say!  As far as I can tell the cottage is no longer lived in and yet the owner has gone to the trouble of putting a pot of flowers on the windowsill.  It reminds me of ‘Old Ireland’, of days different to these.  Of course for all the romantic notions of yesteryear we know there was much that was bad about Old Ireland, and in so many ways the Ireland of today (despite its many faults) is a better place to live.  But still, I sometimes wish I could time-travel and experience the days when living in cottages like this was the norm and when people had more time and when the world was in less of a hurry than it is now…

October 1, 2010

Rain

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He draws up the water vapour
and then distills it into rain.
The rain pours down from the clouds,
and everyone benefits.
(Job 36:27-28)

Photo taken on the Cork Kerry border on the N71 between Kenmare and Glengarriff.