Posts tagged ‘Courtmacsherry’

November 26, 2012

South Pole 15,722 km

 

Patrick Keohane, a native of Courtmacsherry was a member of Scott’s ultimately tragic Terra Nova Expedition of 1910-13.

 

I really like the monument that has been recently been erected in his honour …

… and the sense of humour that led to this sign being posted!

 

Advertisements
June 25, 2012

Three fishermen

The rain was pouring heavily down as we walked along the beach.  That morning I had been reading a book I had bought the day before (courtesy of a generous book token) called “Ansel Adams 400 Photographs”.   Full of inspiration from looking at Ansel’s legendary pictures I just had to bring the camera with me (in a waterproof bag of course).  I think I wanted to prove to myself that it was possible to get a picture even in ridiculously wet weather – of course having the three fishermen there helped with the final result and the rain actually gives a kind of watercolor texture that is a bit different to the norm.  I hope they caught lots of Mackerel for all their efforts!

(Larger version on Flickr here.)

May 10, 2011

A walk to Wood Point

Yesterday we took the opportunity of some welcome sunshine to take our visitors on a walk to Wood Point via the beach and woodland at Courtmacsherry.

As close to the edge as I dared!

Wood Point.  I didn’t know the name of this spot as it is not given any name on my recent Ordnance Survey map.  It was only by going to the OSI website and looking at the historic overlay from 1887-1913 that the name was given (though to add confusion the name “Land Point” is given in the even earlier 1829-1842 overlay).

The “Navigational Aid” – wearing its rust with pride!

Walking back through the woods, some bluebells…

The pressures of my work have been considerable of late and it was wonderful to be able to get away  – even if only for an hour or two, a real blessing it was.

November 18, 2010

Harbouring?

Courtmacsherry Harbour

This was Courtmacsherry harbour last week as we waited for “The Storm”. It’s strange how the word “harbouring” seems (to me at least) to have negative connotations. We hear about someone “harbouring criminals” or someone “harbouring” bad thoughts or bitterness / resentment in their hearts, which is of course something that we need to be aware of.

But I like to think of what God Harbours us from, though even as I write that many many objections pop up in my mind!  It is a deep and holy privilege of my work to listen to and to pray with people who have experienced every high and every low that life has to offer.  Yes I can think of many times when a sick person has recovered, when a potential tragedy has been averted or the joy of when a person accepts Jesus as their Lord and Saviour.  But I can also bring to mind many times when a sick person has not recovered, when a tragedy has happened and of trying to minister to people who have no cause for any kind of hope or joy in their lives.

Bishop Paul Colton struck a chord with many people last week with a ‘tweet’.  Trying to come to terms with the sudden tragic death of a young man on a hockey pitch he wrote the next morning:

Yesterday was a day when my and others’ prayers were not answered. It’s hard to pray again today. Club is heartbroken. Andrew Chambers, RIP

Sometimes it seems that God does not shelter us, we are left to face the full blast of the storm, apparently on our own.  We cry out to him for help but our prayers are swallowed by a great void of nothingness.  I am reminded what what C.S. Lewis wrote after the death of his wife in his book “A grief observed” On trying to pray he experienced:

“… A door slammed in your face, and a sound of bolting and double bolting on the inside. After that, silence”

As I struggled to come to terms this week with Andy Chambers’ death, as my prayers joined those of hundreds, (if not thousands) of others in praying for his family and friends, and for Bishop Paul as he ministered in that situation, a strange sentence kept repeating itself over and over in my mind.  The words were strange, but I immediately knew what they were and Who it was that spoke them:

‘Eli, Eli, lema sabachthani?’

Link

They are the words of Jesus on the cross “My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?”  If we ever feel forsaken by God, if our despair is too great, our pain too intense or our anger too hot, then these words of Christ become our words.  In this life we can only ever have a partial answer, but if Christ himself knew what it was like then it perhaps is against the hard, rough and blood-stained foot of the cross that we find the beginnings of a response…

—————————————————————
Photo notes:  This picture is actually sixteen separate pictures ‘stitched’ together as a panorama – it takes a bit of practise to get it right!  Here’s how to do it with a digital SLR:  First of all set the lens to 50mm equivalent (to minimise distortion), then take a meter reading from the brightest part of the scene.  Then put the camera in manual mode and set it to whatever the meter reading was (eg. f10, 1/250 sec) then disable the auto ISO (I used ISO 200) and manually set the white balance (I used ‘cloudy’ for the above), finally make sure to turn autofocus off and depending on the scene set it for just short of infinity.  Then start at one end and work your way across taking pictures.  Make sure that you have plenty of overlap with each picture as this helps the computer to create the image afterwards.  (You can do this using JPEG’s, but I use RAW files, again to give the computer more to work with).  If you have photoshop you are laughing, I have an old version of photoshop elements which does the job almost as well, though there are many other programmes both free and expensive that will do the job for you.  If you want to know more, just ask and I will be happy to help.

August 18, 2010

"My lovely horse…"

1008fp4023

We came across these friendly fella’s on a walk near Courtmacsherry.  On looking at the picture now I can’t help but laugh as I remember the Father Ted episode “A song for Europe”, with the “My Lovely Horse” music video.  They don’t make ’em like that any more.  Ha Ha LOL !

My lovely horse, running through the fields.
Where are you going with your fetlocks blowing in the wind?
I want to shower you with sugar lumps and ride you over fences.
Polish your hooves every single day, and bring you to the horse dentist….

May 28, 2010

Courtmacsherry

Courtmacsherry comes alive during the summer months.  It really is a beautiful place and a perfect spot for holidaymakers (if only the sunshine could be guaranteed!)

Whilst I was there yesterday it was pretty quiet, but there is anticipation in the air.  The Church of Ireland community are beginning to get the wonderful little church building ready for the summer season and those involved in the tourism industry are hoping and praying that this year will be a good one.

Quite correctly, the people of Courtmacsherry are very proud of their Lifeboat.  The Lifeboat Station has been there since 1825 and many lives have been saved over the years between then and now.

Of course there is a clear parallel between the work of the Lifeboat Station and the work of the Church.  Both are in the business of saving souls; the Lifeboat crew save people from drowning, Jesus saves us from ourselves and sets us on the rock of salvation…

From Psalm 40:

I waited patiently for the LORD; 
he turned to me and heard my cry.
He lifted me out of the slimy pit, 
out of the mud and mire; 
he set my feet on a rock 
and gave me a firm place to stand.
He put a new song in my mouth, 
a hymn of praise to our God. 
Many will see and fear 
and put their trust in the LORD.