Posts tagged ‘Delta 100’

September 23, 2011

Bantry Harbour

I rediscovered these pictures last week that I had taken earlier on in the year.  I had gone to visit someone in Bantry Hospital and the little harbour for fishing boats caught my eye.  I pulled the car over and got out armed with my Olympus OM-1 and 50mm lens.  The film was Ilford Delta 100 and I used a yellow filter to help bring out detail in the sky (without it the sky appears just white).

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There were a couple of old fishermen about that looked like they had seen more than their fair share of wind and rain and storms enough for several lifetimes.  I wish I’d had the courage to ask them if I could take a photo of them, but we just said ‘hello’ as they continued to eye me with curiosity as I took pictures (about 5 in total) of their boats.  I had taken the clerical collar out of my shirt as an attempt to look somewhat ‘normal’, but I’m sure I still stuck out like a sore thumb!  Anyway I was quite happy with the pictures I had taken and the experience gave me something to smile about on the journey home.

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August 25, 2010

The Blacksmith

Blacksmith

Not since I had seen a horse being fitted with new ‘shoes’ as a boy had I seen a Blacksmith at work.  The opportunity came unexpectedly upon a family outing to the Traditional Farm at Muckross House.  Watching this man it was easy to see that he had great skill as he hammered away at a rod of hot iron, making a pair of tongs designed to lead a bull with (the pincers of the tongs are inserted into the bulls nose – the joys of being a farmer!)

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It was a challenge to photograph.  I had Ilford Delta 100 loaded into the Nikon F100.  Fortunately I had a ‘fast’ 50mm f1.8, but it was still very dark.  I decided to spot meter off the red-hot section of the tongs, which gave me a shutter speed of about 1 1/2  seconds at f1.8.  Of course this meant that the picture would never be sharp so I hoped instead to catch some of the movement of the Blacksmiths arm as he brought down the hammer and some of the sparks that flew off the metal.  It didn’t turn out quite as I had hoped but not as bad as I had feared either – so we’ll call it a draw!

August 16, 2010

Templebryan Stone Circle

Templebryan Stone Circle, Clonakilty

Who knows what went on here?  Was it for worship of the Sun or Moon, sacrifices or perhaps some kind of observatory?  This is no Stonehenge but impressive enough in its own way.  I first came across this stone circle earlier in the Summer when I was driving through Shannonvale.  I noticed the stones poking above the hedgerow and decided to stop and have a look.  A few days ago I passed again.  With the Sun high and bright in the sky, the light was not the best for a photograph (too much shadow and contrast), but then maybe the Sun is what these stones were put here for in the first place.

Since I wrote the above paragraph, I managed to find a link to this place.  The small stone you can just about see in the centre is made of quartz and is called the “Sun Stone”.  In Irish this is “Cloich Griene” which became the “Clon” in Clonakilty (the second part of the name has something to do with woodland so the name Clonakilty means “stone in the trees” or something.  Note – If you know any Irish please feel free to correct!  I see from the link above that there is a nearby early Christian site with an Ogham stone. I look forward to going to have a look at this sometime – the transformation of these ancient people from worshipping the Sun to worshipping the Son is something I’d love to know more about…

August 13, 2010

I got to drive a classic car…

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… Well sort of.  There was nobody around to hear my pretend engine noises and tyre squeals as I took the Ford Model T for a spin.  I pass this fantastic sculpture several times a week; often there are tourists sitting in and on it having their pictures taken and so I thought that I would stop (when things were quiet) and have a go…

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This wonderful piece of work was the Millennium project of Ballinascarthy Community Council.  The plaque reads:

“You can have it any colour as long as its black”
These were the immortal words uttered by one of the greatest minds of the 20th Century, HENRY FORD. 
Henry’s family were residents in this very village prior to having emmigrated to the United States.  The Ford legacy can still be seen around us today having never hesitated since revolutionising the motor industry in 1908 through the development of the worlds first mass produced automobile – The “Model T”.  This car became a car for the people and by 1927 over 15 million had been built.  Truly this car and its inventor were catalysts of the modern motor industry and by the time of his death in 1947 Henry had 
“Put the World on Wheels”

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So if you are ever heading into West Cork along the N71, don’t forget to stop in Ballinascarthy and take the  Model T for a test drive :~)