Posts tagged ‘English Market’

September 17, 2012

Give us this day our daily bread

Photo:  ‘The Alternative Bread Company’, English Market, Cork.  (Photo on Flickr here.)

It all started with a trip to the dentist. The week before he had warned me that for my next visit I was going to be sat in the chair for about an hour and a half.  With this not particularly welcome bit of news there was an up side – I had a few days to think about what I could do with my time in that chair.  My first thought was to listen to music via headphones but I needed to be able to hear what the dentist had to say so that was not an option. I eventually decided to try and (silently!) pray the Lord’s prayer instead, not just say it through a hundred times, but to pray it through once, spending time on each line, mulling the words over, what they meant, their implications and so on. Well I have to say that it was the best time I have ever spent in the dentists chair! With my mouth numbed because of the anesthetic and my eyes closed, I hardly noticed the horrendous drilling, filing and general carpentry going on in the workshop that was my mouth. Instead I found myself marveling at God ‘our Father’, with a name that was very ‘hallowed’, and so on. When I got to ‘thy kingdom come’, I felt like I could have gone on and on indefinitely; ‘thy kingdom come… into my life, Sonja’s life, our boys, then wider and wider outwards to, family, friends, neighbours, strangers, events and people in the news, even the dentist and his assistant!

Of all the lines, it was ‘give us this day our daily bread’, that I mulled over the most.  For so many people, poverty is a gruelling, grinding, daily reality; they do not have enough daily bread because people in wealthy countries (like me) have too much and hoard too much rather than give it away. I think it all ties in well with ‘thy kingdom come’; in many ways the advancement (or not) of God’s kingdom is in some ways entirely up to us (a scary thought).

When I got home I was looking for a book on the shelves in the study when my eyes caught another book altogether – I had completely forgotten about it and it is one that I have never read since picking it up at a second-hand stall a number of years ago.  It’s called “Praying the Lord’s Prayer” by Terry Virgo.  In the chapter entitled Give us today our daily bread, he writes:

If God’s highest gift is his Son, what’s his most basic gift?  Couldn’t it be ‘our daily bread’?  The two are extremes.  Surely God is telling us that if he’s willing to give us both the most precious and the most common things, he is more than wiling to supply us with everything in between.

Perhaps I realise now more than I ever did previously that EVERYTHING is a gift from God.  It is easy to see eternal life as a gift (for what else could it be?) But what about every breath, every heartbeat, every person with whom we come into contact, each and every day, each meal, indeed everything in this world and in this life that is good being a gift from God?  It is wonderful and liberating to know that none of the things I have are really mine anyway, they all belong to God, and I am learning (albeit slowly) that that really is the best way for it to be…

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March 26, 2012

Random Light No.6

Clonakilty St. Patrick's Day 2

This is a great little shop in Clonakilty, with floor to ceiling shelves stocked with plastic things made in China!
Field sprayed with a herbicide

The field behind our house a few days after being sprayed with ‘weed killer’.  Our water supply comes from the reservoir you can see as a green mound behind the tree in the field :-(

Chocolates in English Market

Chocolates for sale in the English Market, Cork.

Church of the Immaculate Conception, Clonakilty

Church of the Immaculate Conception, Clonakilty
Cats like to read too!

Jasper the cat was interested in one of the books that the boys brought home from the library…
Moon and star

The Moon and Venus taken last night.
Lady Bird

Greenfly be very afraid!

July 27, 2009

Worldwide Photo Walk: Cork

Nikon D70s, f5, 1/125 sec, ISO 200, 69mm equivalent

Nikon D70s, f4.5, 1/80 sec, -0.33 Ev, ISO 200, 27mm equivalent

Nikon D70s, f4.5, 1/125 sec, ISO 640, 84mm equivalent

Nikon D70s, f8, 1/125 sec, ISO 200, 27mm equivalent


A couple of Saturdays ago I had the pleasure of meeting up with a bunch of photographers for a “photo walk” around Cork city, organised by Donncha O Caoimh as part of Scott Kelby’s Worldwide photo walk. I’d never done anything like this before at all and it was really great fun. Normally when I start talking to people about available light, aperture, hyperfocal distance and so on the yawns come even quicker than during one of my Sunday sermons. But here I was, able to converse in photographer’s gobbledegook and learn so much from others who knew a lot more than me.

The city was very crowded with various events that were happening, so the group dwindled as the afternoon wore on. I lost them after about two hours or so but by then I’d managed to take 88 pictures and went home happy.

You can see everyone’s pictures on a Flickr group. I can’t wait until the next photo walk, when hopefully the sun will shine for a bit longer than the 5 minutes it did on this occasion!

April 7, 2009

The food of love …

The Chocolate Shop, English Market, Cork
Panasonic LX1, f2.8, 1/30 sec, ISO 80, 28mm equivalent

Shakespeare said that “If music be the food of love …”. Of course, I’m sure he’s right, but I would like to also put forward the case for something else … chocolate!

Eat … delicacies that melt in your mouth. Likewise knowledge, and wisdom for your soul— Get that and your future’s secured, your hope is on solid rock.

Proverbs 26:13,14 (Abbreviated from The Message)

January 16, 2009

English Market, Cork

Panasonic LX1, 1/8 sec, f2.8, ISO 200, 34 mm equivalent, (Click to Enlarge)

Panasonic LX1, 1/30 sec, f2.8, ISO 125, 34 mm equivalent (Click to Enlarge)

I enjoyed a leisurely stroll through the old English Market yesterday whilst between appointments. It really is a wonderful place to shop; there is always a buzz about the place as people go about their business buying fantastic food – meat, fish, breads, cheeses and various exotic culinary delights from around the world. It is the antithesis of modern supermarkets, which feel so clinical (and cynical) in comparison…

The LORD abhors dishonest scales, but accurate weights are his delight.

(Proverbs 11:1)