Posts tagged ‘field’

April 15, 2015

Good soil

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Earlier this morning while taking the dog for a walk, something about the field behind our house made me want to go and have a closer look. The sun, still at a low angle was shining across the soil, highlighting the long furrows created by the ploughing that took place yesterday.

There was an almost palpable sense of expectation coming from the ground, a sense of readiness and anticipation. Soon the crop will be planted and growth will begin.

Jesus’ story about a sower sowing seeds provides a wonderful description of those who allow his words to take root in the fertile and receptive soil of their minds:

“… And other seeds fell into good soil and produced grain, growing up and increasing and yielding thirtyfold and sixtyfold and a hundredfold.”

Mark 4:8

How good and receptive is our soil? Perhaps a bit of weeding is needed, perhaps there are some rocks to be cleared away!

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July 3, 2014

Random Light No. 9

Here are some photos taken in the last few months…

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A Worcestershire Poppy field

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Colourful Kinsale

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Evening Reflections at Trimpley reservoir, Worcestershire

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A family of ducks makes their way home in the last light of the day…

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One of Fota’s more colourful residents…

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Bantry harbour boats (with “cross-process” effect)

DSC_8811_wpMwnt, Ceredigion.

 

July 17, 2013

Random Light No. 8

Hungry Horse 1

Shire Horse at Courtmacsherry, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/1000 ƒ/6.7 ISO 160 35mm

Manch Woods

Bluebells at Manch Woods, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/90 ƒ/8 ISO 220 35mm

Mullaghmore Harbour

Mullaghmore Harbour, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/250 ƒ/8 ISO 100 35mm

Mullaghmore window

Mullaghmore Window, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/750 ƒ/5.6 ISO 100 35mm

Loughanelteen Panorama

Loughanelteen, Co. Sligo, (Panorama taken with Samsung Galaxy Note II)

Ripening Barley

Ripening Barley, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/125 ƒ/6.7 ISO 200 300mm

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Pippa the puppy, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/125 ƒ/3.3 ISO 100 35mm

June 18, 2012

From small beginnings

Looking again at this photo I took on Saturday, it brought to mind yesterday’s gospel reading, especially:

The Kingdom of God is like a farmer who scatters seed on the ground.  Night and day, while he’s asleep or awake, the seed sprouts and grows, but he does not understand how it happens.  The earth produces the crops on its own. First a leaf blade pushes through, then the heads of wheat are formed, and finally the grain ripens.

(Mark 4:26-28)

What a great encouragement these verses are to anyone involved in any kind of Christian ministry; it might seem that nothing is happening and yet (if it is of God) then there is much going on behind the scenes that we may be unaware of.  One day the harvest will come…

March 26, 2012

Random Light No.6

Clonakilty St. Patrick's Day 2

This is a great little shop in Clonakilty, with floor to ceiling shelves stocked with plastic things made in China!
Field sprayed with a herbicide

The field behind our house a few days after being sprayed with ‘weed killer’.  Our water supply comes from the reservoir you can see as a green mound behind the tree in the field :-(

Chocolates in English Market

Chocolates for sale in the English Market, Cork.

Church of the Immaculate Conception, Clonakilty

Church of the Immaculate Conception, Clonakilty
Cats like to read too!

Jasper the cat was interested in one of the books that the boys brought home from the library…
Moon and star

The Moon and Venus taken last night.
Lady Bird

Greenfly be very afraid!

September 14, 2011

Harvest 2011

Driving along the coastal road heading East from Timoleague, a field caught my eye.  Perhaps it was the interesting light or the geometry of the bales of straw I don’t know, but I thought there was something picture-worthy about the scene.

Amidst the rhythm and routine of parish life, ‘Harvest’ refers not only to the long days of work that farmers put in at this time of year, ever with an eye to the sky and an ear to the weather forecast, but also to the Harvest Season that is an important part of the Church calendar.  Particularly in rural communities where many families livelihoods are linked to the land, ‘Harvest Thanksgiving’ is one of the yearly highlights of parish life.

In the parish where I serve, we have four church buildings and each has an annual Harvest Thanksgiving service.  In Courtmacsherry, a church which is only open for Sunday worship in July and August, we have already held the service on the last Sunday of August.  The small church was packed and as always it was a wonderful atmosphere.  A dairy farmer there reminded me that for anyone who milks cows the harvest is every day, all year round!  This Sunday we celebrate the service in TImoleague (at 11.00am), then on Sunday 25th at 10.00am we celebrate in Kilmalooda.  Finally on Friday 7th October, we celebrate in Clonakilty at 8.30pm.  If you would like more information, have a look at the parish website here.

1. Praise and thanksgiving,
Father, we offer,
for all things living
you have made good;
harvest of sown fields,
fruits of the orchard,
hay from the mown fields,
blossom and wood.

2. Lord, bless the labour
we bring to serve you,
that with our neighbour
we may be fed.
Sowing or tilling,
we would work with you;
harvesting, milling,
for daily bread.

3. Father, providing
food for your children,
your wisdom guiding
teaches us share
one with another,
so that, rejoicing,
sister and brother
may know your care.

4. Then will your blessing
reach every people;
each one confessing
your gracious hand;
when you are reigning
no one will hunger,
your love sustaining,
fruitful the land.

Albert Frederick Bayly (1901-84) altd. – From Church Hymnal, Fifth Ed. 

June 30, 2010

Golden Hour

Towards Castlefreke and Long Strand

Towards Castlefreke and Long Strand

There’s a time in the evening when the sun is thinking about setting but seems reluctant to do so.  Low in the sky the light is soft and filtered, imparting a certain ‘glow’ to everything.

As I stood in that field of Barley, I felt like I was in the midst of a great painting, a work of genius, by the great Artist.  It was a moment of beauty; I could hear the sea rush against the shore to my left and I could smell the earthy ground, still wet from the recent rainfall.  A breeze was gently blowing across the fields so that the Barley seemed – almost – to mimic the movement of the nearby waves.  There was a mist beginning to rise in the distant hollows and I knew that the special light was about to leave, so I reluctantly did the same.

May 25, 2010

Neighbours

Nikon D70s, 1/320sec, f4.8, ISO 200, 180mm

For a couple of weeks towards the end of last month we enjoyed the company of some new neighbours.  It was lovely to see them running and playing in the large green field behind our house.  Often when my wife opened the back door to hang up some washing or do a bit of gardening they would come trotting down to the fence to say hello.  They were quite happy to pose for a photo too!

Then, just as suddenly as they arrived, they were gone.  The field is now empty again, save for a large white horse that keeps to the distant end.  Whether the calves have gone to another field or to market I don’t know, but we miss them :-(

August 8, 2009

Field of Gold

Panasonic LX1, f5.6, 1/400 sec, ISO 80, 28mm equivalent (click to enlarge)

I get to travel around in some very beautiful countryside as I go out visiting people. This field of ripening wheat caught my eye during a trip to the far side of Great Island. The wind was blowing up from the sea, moving the wheat in sea-like waves towards me. A special moment.

For those interested in the technical aspects of the photograph, I used the Gimp (a free photo editor) to mimic the effect of a ’tilt-shift’ lens. If you would like to try it yourself, here’s a helpful ‘how to’ article.

September 3, 2008

Harvest time at Belvelly, Cobh

Canon A570IS, 1/500 sec, f6.3, ISO 80, 5.8mm (Click to enlarge)

The farming community has had a tough ‘summer’, it’s good to see a field with a least a bit of sun on it – even if only for a brief while. This was taken yesterday evening and just this morning the weather had changed rather dramatically for the worse once more.

If only we could find some way to export a few clouds to places that could do with them, like those vineyards in Australia that haven’t had rain for four years. To make matters worse, we got a water bill yesterday and a leaflet urging us of the need to conserve water, as supplies were limited!