Posts tagged ‘Harbour’

July 3, 2014

Random Light No. 9

Here are some photos taken in the last few months…

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A Worcestershire Poppy field

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Colourful Kinsale

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Evening Reflections at Trimpley reservoir, Worcestershire

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A family of ducks makes their way home in the last light of the day…

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One of Fota’s more colourful residents…

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Bantry harbour boats (with “cross-process” effect)

DSC_8811_wpMwnt, Ceredigion.

 

July 17, 2013

Random Light No. 8

Hungry Horse 1

Shire Horse at Courtmacsherry, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/1000 ƒ/6.7 ISO 160 35mm

Manch Woods

Bluebells at Manch Woods, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/90 ƒ/8 ISO 220 35mm

Mullaghmore Harbour

Mullaghmore Harbour, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/250 ƒ/8 ISO 100 35mm

Mullaghmore window

Mullaghmore Window, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/750 ƒ/5.6 ISO 100 35mm

Loughanelteen Panorama

Loughanelteen, Co. Sligo, (Panorama taken with Samsung Galaxy Note II)

Ripening Barley

Ripening Barley, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/125 ƒ/6.7 ISO 200 300mm

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Pippa the puppy, Nikon D7000, Settings: 1/125 ƒ/3.3 ISO 100 35mm

December 3, 2012

Stillness

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Something that I find hard to do (and I know I’m not alone in this), is to be still.  To be able to just sit or stand and listen, listen to the noises around me; traffic in the distance, birds in the tree outside the window, the sound of my breathing, even my heartbeat, is a wonderful thing to do now and again.  One of my favourite quotes from the Bible is from Psalm 46 where the LORD speaks and says:

Be still and know that I am God.

It seems that in all our rushing around and in all our busyness we can miss something that is very important – connecting with God and hearing his ‘still, small voice’.  God taught this lesson to Elijah a long time ago and to this day His voice to us is often no more than a ‘gentle whisper’:

Then a great and powerful wind tore the mountains apart and shattered the rocks before the Lord, but the Lord was not in the wind. After the wind there was an earthquake, but the Lord was not in the earthquake. After the earthquake came a fire, but the Lord was not in the fire. And after the fire came a gentle whisper. (1 Kings 19:11,12)

If I am reading the Bible and am surrounded by noise and busyness then it is a lot harder to hear God ‘speak’ through the words I am reading.  Similarly, in the place of prayer, how much do I rattle on to God about this and that, say ‘Amen’ and then jump back into hectic hurry once more? It is important to be still, to listen, to connect with God, to receive His word, blessing and strength for that which lies ahead.

Stillness is good.

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Photo notes:  Kinsale Harbour on the morning of the 29th November.  Nikon D7000, Nikkor 35mm f1.8.  (ISO 400, f11, 1/350 sec) out of camera jpeg with no post processing, (part of my ‘one camera, one lens, one year’ project).

October 27, 2011

Random Light 3

Some random pictures from the last month…

Red Strand Sunset

Sunset at Red StrandOff to the milking parlour...

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Bantry Bay

Bantry Bay
Fisherman in Bantry Bay

Fisherman, Bantry Bay

Bantry HarbourBantry Harbour

September 23, 2011

Bantry Harbour

I rediscovered these pictures last week that I had taken earlier on in the year.  I had gone to visit someone in Bantry Hospital and the little harbour for fishing boats caught my eye.  I pulled the car over and got out armed with my Olympus OM-1 and 50mm lens.  The film was Ilford Delta 100 and I used a yellow filter to help bring out detail in the sky (without it the sky appears just white).

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There were a couple of old fishermen about that looked like they had seen more than their fair share of wind and rain and storms enough for several lifetimes.  I wish I’d had the courage to ask them if I could take a photo of them, but we just said ‘hello’ as they continued to eye me with curiosity as I took pictures (about 5 in total) of their boats.  I had taken the clerical collar out of my shirt as an attempt to look somewhat ‘normal’, but I’m sure I still stuck out like a sore thumb!  Anyway I was quite happy with the pictures I had taken and the experience gave me something to smile about on the journey home.

November 18, 2010

Harbouring?

Courtmacsherry Harbour

This was Courtmacsherry harbour last week as we waited for “The Storm”. It’s strange how the word “harbouring” seems (to me at least) to have negative connotations. We hear about someone “harbouring criminals” or someone “harbouring” bad thoughts or bitterness / resentment in their hearts, which is of course something that we need to be aware of.

But I like to think of what God Harbours us from, though even as I write that many many objections pop up in my mind!  It is a deep and holy privilege of my work to listen to and to pray with people who have experienced every high and every low that life has to offer.  Yes I can think of many times when a sick person has recovered, when a potential tragedy has been averted or the joy of when a person accepts Jesus as their Lord and Saviour.  But I can also bring to mind many times when a sick person has not recovered, when a tragedy has happened and of trying to minister to people who have no cause for any kind of hope or joy in their lives.

Bishop Paul Colton struck a chord with many people last week with a ‘tweet’.  Trying to come to terms with the sudden tragic death of a young man on a hockey pitch he wrote the next morning:

Yesterday was a day when my and others’ prayers were not answered. It’s hard to pray again today. Club is heartbroken. Andrew Chambers, RIP

Sometimes it seems that God does not shelter us, we are left to face the full blast of the storm, apparently on our own.  We cry out to him for help but our prayers are swallowed by a great void of nothingness.  I am reminded what what C.S. Lewis wrote after the death of his wife in his book “A grief observed” On trying to pray he experienced:

“… A door slammed in your face, and a sound of bolting and double bolting on the inside. After that, silence”

As I struggled to come to terms this week with Andy Chambers’ death, as my prayers joined those of hundreds, (if not thousands) of others in praying for his family and friends, and for Bishop Paul as he ministered in that situation, a strange sentence kept repeating itself over and over in my mind.  The words were strange, but I immediately knew what they were and Who it was that spoke them:

‘Eli, Eli, lema sabachthani?’

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They are the words of Jesus on the cross “My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?”  If we ever feel forsaken by God, if our despair is too great, our pain too intense or our anger too hot, then these words of Christ become our words.  In this life we can only ever have a partial answer, but if Christ himself knew what it was like then it perhaps is against the hard, rough and blood-stained foot of the cross that we find the beginnings of a response…

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Photo notes:  This picture is actually sixteen separate pictures ‘stitched’ together as a panorama – it takes a bit of practise to get it right!  Here’s how to do it with a digital SLR:  First of all set the lens to 50mm equivalent (to minimise distortion), then take a meter reading from the brightest part of the scene.  Then put the camera in manual mode and set it to whatever the meter reading was (eg. f10, 1/250 sec) then disable the auto ISO (I used ISO 200) and manually set the white balance (I used ‘cloudy’ for the above), finally make sure to turn autofocus off and depending on the scene set it for just short of infinity.  Then start at one end and work your way across taking pictures.  Make sure that you have plenty of overlap with each picture as this helps the computer to create the image afterwards.  (You can do this using JPEG’s, but I use RAW files, again to give the computer more to work with).  If you have photoshop you are laughing, I have an old version of photoshop elements which does the job almost as well, though there are many other programmes both free and expensive that will do the job for you.  If you want to know more, just ask and I will be happy to help.

September 28, 2009

There and back again

Panasonic LX1, 5 images @ f5.6, 1/400 sec, ISO 80, (click to enlarge)

Panasonic LX 1, f4.5, 1/250, ISO 80, 28mm equivalent, (click to enlarge)

We had a very enjoyable weekend going over to Llanelli for my Aunt and Uncle’s Golden Wedding Anniversary. It was great to see them and many other family members, some of whom I had not seen since I was a toddler! It was lovely to wake up on a Sunday morning, initially in a panic about getting ready for church- is the sermon ready, what to mention in the prayers etc. and then remember that it was not for me to worry about on this, one of my precious four Sundays off per year.

Happy childhood memories were rekindled as we took a walk around Burry Port harbour yesterday afternoon. The places where I built many sandcastles and went hunting for cockles with my Nanna and Grandad just the same as they always had been. Looking down onto the sands I could almost see myself thirty years earlier digging and building away in childhood reverie…

June 5, 2009

Through a glass, darkly

Nikon D70s, 1/400 sec, f10, ISO 200, EV +1.3, 105mm equivalent

I suppose that because it’s Trinity Sunday in two days time I’ve been thinking a lot about trying to understand God’s nature and character. Let’s face it there are aspects of God that I can never understand much like in a similar way that my son’s goldfish will never be able to grasp (in anything other than a superficial way) who or what is looking at him swimming around his goldfish bowl. Of course God gives us glimpses of His glory and His love, this comes through each of the three Persons of the Trinity as shown to us in the Bible and in our experience in trying to live in a relationship with God and with each other. Even though we now only “see though a glass darkly”, we occasionally get glimpses of something very special in nature that show us further glimpses of the amazing God who is there. This might be in a breathtaking view from the hard-earned summit of a mountain, it may be in seeing the first light in the eyes of our new-born child or it may be something else entirely. Yesterday I had a taste of something of God in watching a school of Dolphins playing near the entrance to Cork Harbour, off Roches Point. A wonderful moment – (and very difficult to photograph too)…

February 26, 2009

Harbour Reflections

Panasonic LX1, 1/125 sec, f4.5, ISO 80, 93mm equivalent (click to enlarge)
October 29, 2008

Kinsale, a Photographers Paradise

Here’s some more photos from our recent family outing to Kinsale, home of the great Giles Norman

Panasonic LX1, 1/640 sec, f5.6, ISO 80, 6.3 mm (Click to enlarge)

Panasonic LX1, 1/1250sec, f8.0, ISO 80, 14.4 mm (Click to enlarge)

Panasonic LX1, 1/400 sec, f5.6, ISO 80, 16.7 mm (Click to enlarge)