Posts tagged ‘Nikon D70s’

August 13, 2015

“Imprints of Light” Exhibition

Soon we will be leaving Cork to move to Dublin, where I will take on a new role as a school chaplain (more on that another day). We have greatly enjoyed our twelve years in this wonderful part of Ireland and God-willing we will return for holidays and other adventures in the future.

One of the things I have been asked to do before we go is to have an exhibition of photographs for the Timoleague Festival. I feel very honoured to have been asked and a little daunted by the whole undertaking. Thankfully I have some excellent help from a parishioner who is also a very accomplished and gifted photographer and who knows a good deal about this sort of thing. The photos will go up later today and the display will be open to the public from Saturday for a week.

Here is a gallery of the photos that have been printed for the exhibition; some of them have appeared on this blog before and others are new:

February 5, 2015

Earth’s shadow

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At the moment I am reading Timothy Keller’s “Prayer, Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God” and I am finding it a great read. A quote quite early on in the book from Flannery O’Connor, beautifully describes the sense of the struggle and frustration that so many of us have with putting God first above all:

Dear God, I cannot love Thee the way I want to. You are the slim crescent of a moon that I see and my self is the earth’s shadow that keeps me from seeing all the moon … what I am afraid of, dear God, is that my self shadow will grow so large that it blocks the whole moon, and that I will judge myself by the shadow that is nothing. I do not know You God because I am in the way.

The implication is that a major aspect of learning to pray (and therefore growing  in our relationship with God) is to not to let ourselves, or rather our ego get in the way. As John the Baptist said of the Lord Jesus:

“… He must increase, but I must decrease.”

Of course this is easier said than done!

April 8, 2012

Night had become day, death had become life.

Welcoming the Sunrise

Easter Sunday, John 20:1-18

I suppose that Mary Magdalene thought that things could not get any worse. Her Lord had been brutally killed and the horror of it all was still very fresh in her mind. Like any of us who have lost someone close, she wanted to go to where the body was. We feel that if we can go to where our loved one is buried that somehow it will help, we cannot find the words to express our loss and our sorrow, the bleakness and finality of it all, but we think that just being there will help, and it does. Perhaps this is what is going through Mary’s mind; she knows Jesus is dead, she saw it happen, but if she can just be near where His body is, perhaps it will help. She probably has had very little if any sleep and so before the sun has even come up she makes her way to the tomb. As she nears the place where Joseph and Nicodemus had laid Jesus’ body to her utter dismay, she sees that the large stone in front of the tomb has been removed and she knows that this can only mean one thing, that Jesus’ body is no longer there. She runs, as fast as she can, on legs that will barely support her to Simon Peter and to John and she says:

> ‘They have taken the Lord out of the tomb, and we do not know where they have laid him.’ (2)

Peter and John waste no time, the news that Mary Magdalen has told them requires an immediate response. I wonder what they are thinking, is it horror at the possibility of Jesus’ body being stolen or at this point is even just a chink of light and hope entering their thoughts? Everything is happening quickly now, Mary had run from the tomb to tell them, now Peter and John run back from where Mary had come. John, the younger of the two men reaches the tomb first, he is cautious and he stops at the entrance and peers inside, he sees the linen wrappings lying there, but does not go in to investigate. Then Peter arrives, perhaps puffing and panting and with no caution whatsoever runs straight into the tomb, he too sees the linen wrappings lying there and also the cloth that had been on Jesus’ head, not lying with the linen wrappings but rolled up in a place by itself (7). John then lets go of whatever it is that is stopping him entering the tomb and he steps inside. Describing his own reaction he says:

> … ‘he saw and believed.'(8)

‘Believed what?’ We might say. Certainly John believed that Jesus was no longer dead. He had seen Lazarus raised from the dead and Jesus had given enough strong hints that He would die and be raised again too (Mark 8:31, Luke 9:22) and now it seems that even as the sun is beginning to rise on that first Easter morning that the light is dawning in John’s mind, that what is happening what was Jesus had been telling them all along, He really was going to be killed and He really was going to rise from the dead. We don’t know why but Peter and John decide to go back to their homes, perhaps it’s to tell the others, perhaps it’s just to try and take in the enormity of the fact of the empty tomb, but as they depart we see that Mary has returned to the place of the tomb once again. Any of us who have stood weeping at a grave will know how she felt, though how much more so if the body we had come to be near was no longer there and we thought it had been stolen? Through her tears, Mary sums up the courage to peer inside the tomb. Instead of darkness, instead of a place of death she sees light, two angels in white sitting where Jesus’ body had been. One angel sits where Jesus’ head had been and the other where his feet once were. The angels speak to Mary saying:

> ‘Woman, why are you weeping?’

Mary replies:

> ‘They have taken away my Lord, and I do not know where they have laid him.’ (13)

Something makes her turn around and she sees a man standing there. She does not know who he is, she thinks he is the gardener. The man speaks to her, as the angels had already done, saying:

> ‘Woman, why are you weeping?’ and then ‘For whom are you looking?’

Still thinking this man was the gardener Mary says:

> ‘Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have laid him, and I will take him away.’ (15)

The man says her name, ‘Mary!’ And now he is no longer just a man, it is Jesus, it really is Jesus! To one moment be in utter despair and in the next be in complete surprise and joy must have been overwhelmingly wonderful for Mary; one moment her world was in chaos, the pattern of her life in shreds and tatters and in the next moment it was utterly transformed; night had become day, hell had become heaven, death had become life.

All Mary can do is turn to Him and say, ‘Rabbouni, teacher’. She clings on to Him, overcome at all that has happened. He is alive! He is not dead! This is the happiest moment, the turning point of history, of his-story, ‘death (as the Apostle Paul would later describe it) has been swallowed up in victory’ (1 Cor. 15:54).

Yes, Jesus was alive, more alive than ever He was in His earthly body. Mary and the others would soon see that Jesus’ resurrected body was different; He could appear before them suddenly in a locked room and He was not a ghost because he could be touched and because he could eat and drink.

Jesus does not wish for Mary to cling on to Him for long, there is something that she needs to do. He says:

> … ‘go to my brothers and say to them, “I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.”‘ (17)

Here is a new level of friendship; Jesus’ Father is their Father too, His God is their God. The same level of intimacy that Jesus has with His Father they can have too. He is their Daddy and they are His dear children.

Of course it is Mary who has the important job of telling the disciples, of bringing them the Good News of Jesus’ message. She goes to them and says:

> ‘I have seen the Lord’

Mary then tells them what Jesus had said. The wonderful thing here is that if someone in the first century had wanted to invent a story about people seeing the risen Jesus, they certainly would not have dreamed about giving the star part to a woman, let alone Mary Magdalene! (From Tom Wright, ‘John for Everyone’ (Part 2) SPCK 2002, p.146)

But there it is, a true story, but one where the ending has not yet been written because the end of the story is up to you. You are standing there with the others at the empty tomb, what do you do, how do you respond? Perhaps you were too busy thinking about lunch or wishing that you had not eaten so much chocolate already this morning, but don’t worry about that now, the risen Jesus is standing before you, as He spoke to Mary, He speaks to you. Listen as He calls you by your name… Let us respond to him now, let us pray:

Lord Jesus, I am overwhelmed that you have risen from the dead and that you would call my name. I feel so totally unworthy and unclean to even be near you, and yet I know that it was because of this, because of my sin that You chose to die. Lord, to say ‘thank you’ seems wholly inadequate, but I say it anyway, with all of my heart, “THANK YOU”. Help me off my knees Lord, help me to follow you, help me to love you, not just now this moment, but for always… Amen.

March 18, 2012

Happy Mother’s Day!

Mother and child Zebra at Fota Wildlife Park

Mother and Joey

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February 5, 2012

How big is our God?

Blue Sky Thinking

(Photo taken at Trimpley Reservoir, Worcestershire, in 2009)

Sermon for today.  Text Isaiah 40:21-31.

There is a story that I read recently of African-American slaves toiling in the hot sun. They are working so very hard to pick cotton. There is a young woman and beside her is her small boy, maybe six or seven. She’s working in the fields and she has such incredible dexterity that she is able to pick cotton with her right hand and caress the forehead of her child with the left. But eventually, exhausted by working so hard in the fields, she falls down from the weight and the pressure of the work.  Her boy attempts to wake her very quickly, knowing that if the slave drivers were to see her the punishment would be swift and hard.

He tries to shake his mother, and as he’s trying to shake her, an old man comes over to him.  He looks up at the old man and says, “Is it time? Is it time?”

The old man smiles and looks at the boy and says, “Yes!” And he bends down and whispers into the ear of the woman who was now upon the ground and says these words: “Cooleebah! Cooleebah!”

At that moment the woman gets up with such incredible dignity. She stands as a queen and looks down at her son, grasps his hand and begins to look toward heaven. All of a sudden they begin to fly. The slave drivers rush over to this area where she has stopped work and they see this act of human flight and are completely confused. They do not know what to do! And during their confusion, the old man rushes around to all the other slaves and begins to tell them, “Cooleebah! Cooleebah!”

When they hear the word, they all begin to fly.  And at that moment the slave drivers grab the old man and say, “Bring them back!”

They beat him, and with blood coming down his cheek, he just smiles at them. They say to him, “Please bring them back!”

And he says, “I can’t.”

They say, “Why not?”

He said, “Because the word is already in them and since the word is already in them, it cannot be taken from them.”

The old man had a word from West Africa, ‘Cooleebah’, a word that means God. It had been placed into the heart of these displaced Africans and now they had dignity and they were flying[1].

How big is our God?  I ask this question because it’s an important one.  Sometimes we have no problem singing “Our God is a great big God…” but other times, especially when problems are looming large our God seems to shrink doesn’t He?  Have you ever heard the expression “You can’t put God in a box”?  It means that we try to restrict God, we try to place limits on what He can and cannot do, and we start to believe that He could not help us, or heal us or provide for us or forgive us, when He can of course do all those things and so much more.  So let us ask ourselves today, “How big is my God”?

The background to our reading from Isaiah is that the people of Judah were in big trouble; for generations they had turned their backs on God and now it was Isaiah’s job to warn them that because they would not change their ways they were going to be punished.  A foreign army was going to come and attack them, defeat them and drag away many captives.  But also there was hope, God would ultimately save them not only from the Assyrians and Babylonians, He would save them from themselves too.  A bit like us, the people’s view of God had become stunted and small, they had not only put God in a box, but also stuffed that box away in a corner and out of sight.  In our reading today, Isaiah reminds his original audience (and us today) that God is all powerful and at the same time longs for those people who have deserted Him to come back.

Isaiah reminds us that there is only one Creator God, who not only originates all, but maintains and controls everything too.  This supreme Creator God also directs all of history towards a definite goal.  Therefore to believe in Him is to be assured of ultimate safety; that both the present and the future are secure in His hands. In verse 21 we read:

Have you not known?  Have you not heard?  Has it not been told you from the beginning? 

Isaiah tells us that it should be obvious to us that God is not only there but that He is also the source of all things; that in comparison we are like grasshoppers, we are very small and He is very great.  I like the second half of verse 22, which reads:

who stretches out the heavens like a curtain, and spreads them like a tent to live in…

I have problems putting a wardrobe together, but God stretched out the vastness of space with a spoken command.

How big is our God?

Isaiah reminds us that the vastness of our universe allows us a glimpse of the might and majesty of our Creator. Philip Yancey in his book “Prayer: Does it make a difference”, gives the following description to help us appreciate the scale of the universe:

If [the galaxy in which we live] the Milky Way galaxy, were the size of the entire continent of North America, our solar system would fit in a coffee cup. Even now, two Voyager spacecraft are hurtling toward the edge of the solar system at a rate of 100,000 miles per hour. For almost three decades they have been speeding away from Earth, approaching a distance of 9 billion miles. When engineers beam a command to the spacecraft at the speed of light, it takes 13 hours to arrive. Yet this vast neighborhood of our sun—in truth, the size of a coffee cup—fits along with several hundred billion other stars and their minions in the Milky Way, one of perhaps 100 billion such galaxies in the universe. To send a light-speed message to the edge of that universe would take 15 billion years.[2]

No matter how big the people of Judah’s problems were, God was greater; no matter how big our problems are, God is greater.  How big is your God?

Look at verse 25 and 26, we continue on with the theme of God’s greatness.  Isaiah asks us to look up at the night sky and says:

“Lift up your eyes on high and see:  Who created these?  He who … numbers them and calls them all by name.”

How many stars do you think there are?  Scientist are not sure, but:

“In July 2003, scientists at a meeting of the International Astronomical Union in Australia announced their latest estimate for the number of stars in the Universe – 70 sextillion. That is 7 followed by a mind-boggling 22 zeros…”[3]

To give us some idea of the large number we are talking about, the number of stars is far greater in number than all the sand on all the beaches in the world.  Yet God not only has them all numbered, he has names for all of them too!

How big is your God?

O.K., you might be getting a bit fed up with me asking that question by now, but I do not mean to nag or annoy and I ask the question to myself too, “how big is my God”?  It’s not very nice to be someone who is suffering in some way and someone starts going on asking you how big your God is.  Of course we have all been there haven’t we, we say that God either doesn’t know about me or if He does He simply doesn’t care or is not powerful enough to make a difference, and if we were to feel like that we wouldn’t be the first to do so, the people in Isaiah’s day felt the same too.  Look at verse 27:

“Why do you say, O Jacob, and speak O Israel, ‘My way is hidden from the LORD, and my right is disregarded by my God’? 

They thought that their way was hidden from God, that He could not see them and that he did not regard them in any meaningful way.  But nothing, NOTHING, could be further from the truth.  Look at the answer the doubters are given, and look a the answer we are given when we think that God doesn’t care about us:

The Lord is the everlasting God, 
the Creator of the ends of the earth. He does not faint or grow weary; his understanding is unsearchable. 
29He gives power to the faint, and strengthens the powerless. 
30Even youths will faint and be weary, and the young will fall exhausted; 
31but those who wait for the Lord shall renew their strength, they shall mount up with wings like eagles, they shall run and not be weary, they shall walk and not faint. 

We grow tired yet God never tires in any way, we only know a few things, God knows everything, (even before it happens).

Have you ever been in a hurry at the airport?  I can remember one time in Dublin airport running to get to the Departure Lounge, carrying a couple of heavy bags and puffing and panting as I went.  Then I looked to my left and noticed a man walking at a normal pace and going at least as fast as I was – he was of course standing on one of those moving platforms that you get at airports.  He was going the same direction as me, with the same amount of baggage and yet with a fraction of the effort!  When we walk with God it is a bit like that, by His Spirit he comes underneath us and bears us along. We’re still walking, but we walk dependent on him[4].

What is going on in your life right now?  Are you tired or sick?  Walk with God.  Are you lacking in faith or courage or wisdom?  Walk with God.  Have you lost your job or worried that you might lose it?  Walk with God.  Perhaps you don’t know how you are going to pay the bills and put food on the table.  Walk with God.  Do you dread going to school or college tomorrow morning?  Walk with God.  Are you afraid, do you seek forgiveness, are you lost or lonely?  Walk with God.  And when you walk with God, before you know it you will be flying.

A.W. Tozer wrote:

“Anything God has ever done, he can do now. Anything God has ever done anywhere, he can do here. Anything God has ever done for anyone, he can do for you.” [5]

Please pray this prayer with me:

Heavenly Father I ask that you would walk with me now and that you would come alongside me and bear me along.  Help me to walk alongside you, to hold on to you.  Help me to not try and walk only with my own strength but to know your support at all times and in every sense.  Lord I have many questions, but I somehow know that You are the answer, I choose to trust you now and for always…

Amen.

January 24, 2012

The ultimate ‘Fail Whale’, a lesson from Jonah.

"The Whale Tail", Clonakilty

Photo:  “The Whale Tail” sculpture in Clonakilty, the nearest I could get to a whale around here without getting on a boat!

Sermon from last Sunday.  Text: Jonah 3:1-5, 10 (though the whole story is discussed).

You’ve got to feel a little bit sorry for Jonah; he was just sitting there, minding his own business and then God comes along and tells him to get up on his feet and go to an enormous city and start preaching.  Imagine if that were us?  There we are sitting down one day, watching T.V. or counting our ‘Friends’ on Facebook and all of a sudden there is a Big Voice and the Big Voice tells us to get up off our backside, to leave our comfortable life in West Cork and go to a big city, far away in another country, where we have never been before and we are to walk the streets and market places and we are to tell people that they had better turn to God, because God is angry with them!  What would go through your mind, how would you react?  Right now, are you trying to push out of your mind something that God has called you to do and you are not yet doing?

Jonah ran away, he wanted to hide, silly thing that, ‘how can you hide from God?’ we say, but haven’t we tried to hide from God sometimes too?

There’s a wonderful few verses in Psalm 139 that go like this:

7Where can I go from your Spirit? 
   
Where can I flee from your presence? 

8If I go up to the heavens, you are there; 
   
if I make my bed in the depths, you are there. 

9If I rise on the wings of the dawn, 
   
if I settle on the far side of the sea, 

10even there your hand will guide me, 
   
your right hand will hold me fast. 

Of course, these are meant to be comforting words, but if you are trying to run away from God, then they will help you to see that it is all pretty pointless, because God is everywhere!

But that doesn’t stop Jonah.  He gets up, then standing at the crossroads and looking at the sign for Nineveh, (which is in the East), he takes the road heading in the opposite direction to a town on the coast called Joppa.  Then from Joppa he pays to board a ship headed west for Tarshish and as far away from God as he can get.

Once on board the ship, perhaps Jonah begins to feel a bit safer, perhaps he feels he can stop looking over his shoulder for a while.  It is an exhausting thing running away from God.  Jonah goes down into the safety of the ships hold and in no time at all he is in a deep sleep.  We are told that the LORD hurls a great wind upon the sea and that there is a mighty storm that threatens to break up the ship. Things are desperate and the crew of the ship sense that there is something supernatural going on here.  Perhaps this is a storm unlike any other they had seen and they reckon that it is somebody’s fault, they cry out to their gods for help and they throw cargo overboard to lighten the ship, but it is no good.  Jonah’s disobedience is putting the lives of everyone on board in grave danger.

But not for long, the captain wakes him up and says:

‘What are you doing sound asleep? Get up, call on your god! Perhaps the god will spare us a thought so that we do not perish.’ (1:6).

They draw lots to see whose fault it is and sure enough the lot falls on Jonah.  The sailors are convinced that it is his fault and they ask him to explain himself.  Jonah replies:

I am a Hebrew,’ … ‘I worship the Lord, the God of heaven, who made the sea and the dry land.’ (1:9)

And when the sailors learn also that Jonah is fleeing from this all-powerful God, they become even more afraid, so they ask him what to do because even as they are speaking the wind and waves are growing in strength and stature.  Jonah replies:

‘Pick me up and throw me into the sea; then the sea will quieten down for you; for I know it is because of me that this great storm has come upon you.’ (1:12)

What an astonishing response.  Jonah realises that he is cornered, that it is ultimately futile trying to run and hide from God and so he gives up and resigns himself to the fact that he has lost, that God has won and they might as well throw him overboard because that is the only way that the storm will stop.  But the sailors don’t want him to die so they try hard to row the ship back to land, but it is no use so they cry out to Jonah’s God asking for mercy and they throw him overboard, into the dark ocean depths … and immediately the sea quietens down.

Perhaps Jonah is convinced he is going to drown, that the light from above will fade as he disappears into the inky blackness of the deep, that yes it is possible to run away from God, but if you succeed the place where you will end up is called hell.  But God has other plans; He sends a big fish to swallow Jonah.

Have you ever been swallowed by a great fish?  No, I haven’t either, but perhaps we have been or are in the same place that Jonah was.  Now at last the running away had stopped, Jonah cries out to the God that he had been running away from and he does something that he had not done for a long time, he prays.  Jonah pours out his gratitude to God that he has not drowned.  Overwhelmed with relief, he looks to God again and over a period of three days and nights, he refocuses his life, he stops trying to be in control and he hands his life back to God.

Jonah learns his lesson (I suppose that it goes without saying that he has learnt it the hard way!) So when God sees that Jonah is a changed man He speaks to the fish and so Jonah is unceremoniously spewed out onto dry land.  He stinks and looks like he’s been in the belly of a fish for three days, but he has been saved, he is alive and stands on solid ground once again.

God tries again, He says:

‘Get up, go to Nineveh, that great city, and proclaim to it the message that I tell you.’ (3:1)

So we are told that Jonah goes into the middle of the city and he speaks out the word that the LORD had given to him, he says:

‘Forty days more, and Nineveh shall be overthrown!’

I imagine that he was probably thinking that they would grab him and throw him in prison, or something much worse, but at least God was on his side now, he was doing the right thing.  But something amazing (and probably most unexpected) happened, in chapter 3:5 we read

5And the people of Nineveh believed God; they proclaimed a fast, and everyone, great and small, put on sackcloth.

Next time you are thinking that people will think you are strange if you tell them about Jesus, think again.  You may very well be surprised at their reaction.  The longer we follow God’s way, the more we realize that we do not need to be afraid, so we certainly do not need to be afraid to tell people that we are going to church, that we are going to a Home Group or helping out with Sunday Club, God can and will use all these things to bring people to Himself.  The people of Nineveh were far from God, but on hearing the message from God they repented and they fasted and they changed their ways, so that in verse 10 we read:

When God saw what they did, how they turned from their evil ways, God changed his mind about the calamity that he had said he would bring upon them; and he did not do it.

If you ever doubted that God is the God of the second chance or that He is the God of new beginnings, read again the story of Jonah!  Just because we have made mistakes in the past, it does not disqualify us from serving God in the future.  On our own, none of us are good enough, none of us are qualified enough to serve God.  It is all down to His love, His mercy, His healing, and His undeserved favour.  One of the most incredible verses in the whole Bible is found in Romans 5:8, it says simply this:

‘… but God shows his love for us in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us’. (ESV)

God loved Jonah and He proved it by not leaving him to be a victim of his own choices and in rescuing him from the dark depths of his own decisions.  God loved the people of Nineveh so much that He wanted to rescue them from themselves and the mistakes they had made.  He wanted to warn them and He wanted them to change their minds and be saved.  God loves you and me beyond all measure and He proves it by giving His Son to die for us, in the place that we deserved upon the cross.

Please don’t let your life become a tangled, mixed up mess of your own wrong choices and bad decisions, hand it over to God, all of it.  Trust Him, He does, after all know what He is doing … Amen.

October 27, 2011

Random Light 3

Some random pictures from the last month…

Red Strand Sunset

Sunset at Red StrandOff to the milking parlour...

Milking time…DSC_7911

Bantry Bay

Bantry Bay
Fisherman in Bantry Bay

Fisherman, Bantry Bay

Bantry HarbourBantry Harbour

October 19, 2011

Letting go…

I came across this wonderful sculpture on a recent walk around Bantry.  Nearby is a plaque which reads:

The Spirit of Love

In remembrance of those who lost their lives in the waters of Bantry Bay.

Peace, kind reader, do not cry
Nor pass not, pass not quickly by
Surely we shall meet again
No more to part, no more to die
Saviour of the mighty sea
Let us find repose in Thee.
(Written by Donal Fitzgerald)

Artist’s note

This sculpture expresses the compassion of the people of Bantry and Ireland for men, women and children of all races and creeds who lost their lives in this bay.

The two figures convey love, loss, anguish, forgiveness, peace, reaching, letting go…

Paddy Campbell, 2006

Hmm, two posts now about loss.  Sometimes people ask me how I cope with all the loss and pain I come across in visiting homes around the parish.  The answer is that I talk about it with God in the place of prayer, I talk about those aspects that are not confidential with my better half and usually in some kind of abstract way it comes out in this blog too…

But thank God! He gives us victory over sin and death through our Lord Jesus Christ.

(1 Corinthians 15:57, NLT)

September 19, 2011

Rust

Looking at this rusty old bit of metal that forms part of the sea defences at Red Strand, one can’t help but be struck with a new appreciation of the powerful forces of nature. The sea never gives up; day after day, year after year and for millennia. Metal, concrete and stone do not stand a chance, it may take its time, but the sea will conquer in the end.

I don’t know what obstacles you have in your life, but even though they might seem immovable and adamant in their permanence, there is a Force that is altogether greater…

Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will not pass away. Mark 13:31

This past few days I’ve had the privilege to spend time with three people in the last hours of their life and then to do the funerals of two of them.  It is impossible not to be affected by this experience, which is both a huge honour and privilege.  It affects me differently each time but perhaps this last week I have been able to understand things from an eternal perspective more; that this life is little more than a preparation, a beginning for that life which is to come.  In the midst of all this we have a God, an awesome God who is always there and who does not change.  He is with us in life and He is with us in death and He is with us in that life which is to come.

And, “You, Lord, laid the foundation of the earth in the beginning, and the heavens are the work of your hands; they will perish, but you remain; they will all wear out like a garment, like a robe you will roll them up, like a garment they will be changed. But you are the same, and your years will have no end.” (Hebrews 1:10-12)

September 9, 2011

Summer’s Curtain Call