Posts tagged ‘Sunset’

January 17, 2012

Random Light No.5

Some photos from the last few weeks…

Rose B&W

The Rose bush outside our Kitchen window is a never ending source of inspiration.
Gullanes Sunset (again)!

Taken one evening from the back garden.

Kilkenny window

“And now we shall look through the Round Window…”

Kilkenny rainbow

Rainbow over the rooftops of Kilkenny.

Mini wedding car

A “Mini” wedding.

'Here doggy doggy...'

A couple of the Residents at Hayfield Manor, Cork.

Curracloe grass

Marram grass, at Curracloe, Co. Wexford.

Advertisements
December 20, 2011

“Upon another shore…”

Gullanes Sunset

The Sun setting yesterday.  

You may recognise the words in the title as part of the ‘bidding prayer’ at the traditional Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols. The full paragraph reads:

Lastly let us remember before God all those who rejoice with us, but upon another shore and in a greater light, that multitude which no man can number, whose hope was in the Word made flesh, and with whom, in the Lord Jesus, we for evermore are one.

Beautiful words, but do they stand up?  I think that they do, which is all the more amazing because standing up to the the full blast of darkness that is death is some achievement.  The words are of course inspired by Scripture, (from John chapter 1 and Revelation chapter 19 in particular).

Why has this come to my mind?  In the last few days, three people I know have died.  All of them as it were ‘went before their time’, their lives cut short through illness or disease and one, the mother of young children.  It is heartbreaking.

In trying to respond I realise that any words I have to say are wholly insufficient.  I recall some words written by C.S. Lewis in his overwhelming book, ‘A Grief Observed’:

And we think of this as love cut short; like a dance stopped in mid career or a flower with its head unluckily snapped off – something truncated and therefore lacking its due shape…

I suppose that we only have a limited view now, not only of death but even more so of that Life which follows.  The Apostle Paul, inspired by the Spirit of God wrote:

For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known.

One day it will make sense, and this knotted, tangled, painful life of fragility and contradictions will find its shape – even the shape of the Cross, where even God was not free of the pain and anguish of death.  To paraphrase Tony Campolo – ‘Yes it’s Friday now, but Sunday is coming…’

March 7, 2010

What’s the word?

Taken with an iphone (enlarge)

I’ve been trying over the last day or so to think of the word or term in literature where the weather or environment reflects the human emotion or condition being displayed. So for example, when a person is broken hearted it is raining outside, lightning erupts when they are angry, it is sunny when they are full of joy etc.

This all came to mind as I was coming away from the meal after a funeral. We had earlier buried someone and spent the hours since trying to come to terms with the ending of a long, good and happy life and pledging our ongoing support to those left behind.
As I walked out the door the sky was clear and the sun was setting. But it was more than the sun that was setting that day. To me it was a display of something beyond words, yes a life had set but it would rise again in eternity…
The best term I can come up with thanks to a search on the internet is “Pathetic Fallacy“. That does not seem to be the term that we learnt in school though – it seems too harsh to describe something that can be so powerful and beautiful and … numinous.
July 17, 2009

B&W

Nikon D70s, f6.3, 1/160 sec, ISO 200, 105mm equivalent

Nikon D70s, f7.1, 1/200 sec, ISO 200, 51mm equivalent

Nikon D70s, f9, 1/320sec, ISO 200, 27mm equivalent

Panasonic LX1, f5.6, 1/400 sec, ISO 80, 28mm equivalent

I don’t know why but I’m in a black and white phase at the moment. I think this happens when there are lots of shadows and textures in the pictures that I want to emphasise, something that often is not noticed in a colour picture.

OK the first one was taken at a place called “Cae Du“, near um well not near anywhere really, but obviously on the coast and looking west and north towards Snowdonia.

The Rickety old bridge is near Barmouth. It was one of those “do you think we’ll make it moments”, but we made it, having to pay 60p for the privilege – quite a contrast from our journey to Dublin port to get the ferry, where we had to pay €12 to get through the tunnel!

Before we had two little ones in tow, my wife and I had greatly enjoyed climbing England and Wales’ highest mountain, Snowdon, complete with a cold beer in the restaurant at the top! Now though we have to get the train so this picture was taken out of the window on the incredible hour-long journey.

Finally one from Shell Island again (see last post), on this beach there are apparently 200 different types of shell, we managed to find about 20 or so…